Mike Bryant's Dive Trips, Photo Galleries

Flying Gurnard, creeping

along

Flying Gurnard, flaring its

pectoral fins

The fins are usually

folded, getting them like

this is not easy

This was an unusually

co-operatve Gurnard

Polka Dot Batfish. Just

plain weird

Polka Dot Batfish

Polka Dot Batfish

Polka Dot Batfish. If you

look closely, it's

extending a little feeding

"lure" above its mouth.

Shortnose Batfish

Shortnose Batfish. Here's

an overhead so you get a

better idea of the shape.

Shortnose Batfish

Atlantic Longarm

Octopus

Atlantic Longarm

Octopus

Atlantic Longarm

Octopus, burying itself in

the sand

Atlantic Longarm

Octopus, sometimes they

get out of the sand and

stand up for a look

around

Atlantic Longarm

Octopus. I have only seen

previously seen this

"stand up" behavior with

Pacific species like the

Mimic Octopus

Common Octopus, small,

living in a piece of

wreckage

Common Octopus

Tiny Common Octopus

making a home out of a

beer bottle

Plumed Scorpionfish,

marching along the sand

Plumed Scorpionfish

Plumed Scorpionfish,

lurking and waiting for

something small to swim

by

Striated Seahorse, well

camouflaged

Striated Seahorse

Lancer Dragonet

Seaweed Blenny.

Blennies have little

"tufts" over their eyes

and usually live in holes

or crevices.

Seaweed Blenny maybe

1-1/2 inches

Sailfin Blenny.

Maddening to

photograph, this is a

male doing its "dance".

About 2 inches

Sailfin Blenny. They dart

out of their hole, flash the

dorsal fin for a second

then drop back in

You need to find an

active Sailfin and this one

popped out every few

minutes. Most don't.

And you need patience. I

spent 35 minutes in the

same place to get these

five shots

Thank you Sailfin

Molly Miller Blenny. This

one is a male, guarding

eggs,  it won't come out

of its crevice on the

bridge pilings

Molly Miller, about 4

inches.

I don't know who Molly

Miller was but the name

goes back to the 1800's

so she wasn't a punk

rocker

Dusky Jawfish. They

make and live in burrows

and seldom come fully

out with divers around

Dusky Jawfish

Male Dusky Jawfish. The

males incubate the eggs

in their mouths

Male Dusky Jawfish,

about 2-1/2 inches

These eggs are almost

ready to hatch, you can

see the eyes of the

embryonic fish

Banded Jawfish. Much

bigger than the Dusky,

about 6 inches, also

incubating eggs

Banded Jawfish

Banded Jawfish

Banded Jawfish

These eggs are just about

to hatch

Blue Heron Bridge, May 2013

        Home Click HERE to enter galleries. Fiji. May 2011 Beqa Lagoon Shark Dive Bahamas Sharks Red Sea, Egypt 2006 Indonesia 1. The Good. Indonesia 2. The Bad. Indonesia 3. The Ugly. Indonesia 4. Nudibranchs. Indonesia 5. Critters. Great White Shark St Vincent, 2009 Red Sea, Egypt 2009 Galapagos Underwater Galapagos Land Machias Seal Island, Maine. June 2010 St Kitts and Saba, August 2010 Philippines, Puerto Galera January 2011 Fish. Philippines, Puerto Galera January 2011 Creatures Fiji, May 2011. Beqa Reefs Bali, Indonesia 2012. Fish. Bali, Indonesia 2012. Behaviors and critters. Bali, Indonesia 2012. Nudibranchs. Blue Heron Bridge, Riviera Beach, Florida. North Sulawesi 2013. Pipefish and Seahorses North Sulawesi 2013. Fish North Sulawesi 2013. Mostly Nudibranchs North Sulawesi 2013. Crabs and Critters North Sulawesi 2013. Cuttlefish and Octopus Blue Heron Bridge, May 2013 Komodo, Indonesia. August 2014, daytime Komodo, Indonesia. August 2014, night dives Philippines, Dumaguete 2015 Fish Philippines Dumaguete 2015, Creatures and Critters Dominica, 2015 Raja Ampat, January 2016 Cayman Islands, October 2016 North Sulawesi 2017. Fish North Sulawesi 2017, Creatures Anilao, Philippines 2017. Fish Anilao, Philippines 2017. Eels, Pipefish Anilao, Philippines 2017. Crabs, shrimp, octopus. Anilao, Philippines 2017. Nudibranchs.

Back to Riviera Beach in Florida for the unique diving on the pilings and

surroundings of the Blue Heron Bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway.  This was a

short trip and was limited to four dives as they have to be timed around the high tides.

Again. we decided that some local knowledge would simplify our lives and the very

experienced Lazaro Ruda who showed us around for the first two dives certainly

provided that (www.thelivingsea.com). We were fortunate to meet up with marine

study experts Ned and Anna De Loach, along with their companionable local diving

friends for the next two dives.

We stayed at the Hotel Paradise, very clean, more than reasonably priced and

convenient--just a three minute drive to Phil Foster Park, the access to the bridge

diving- It's owned by Allan Paradise and is well suited for divers with rinse hoses

readily available. Website is   www.singerislandhotel.com

As last year, the Force E shop on the west side of the bridge was an easy source for

tanks, weights and other rental gear.

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